Brazing copper pipe – the mystery of Rosebud

Brazing copper pipe – the mystery of Rosebud.

What is Rosebud?

              For you movie fans, Rosebud is not a mythological childhood sled from a strange childhood! It’s a type of torch tip that looks like a rosebud, which is great for the kind of rapid broad heating that’s great for brazing copper.

Rosebud flame – brazing copper

Soldering is the process which has two items to be joined by melting  the filter metal in the joint. Soldering is quite different from welding copper pipe  as it does not involve the melting of the work pieces(welding copper pipe actually melts the metal pipe). Brazing is in between welding and soldering heat wise. You can easily learn to braze successfully at your home. The first tip for is that you need to use the proper flame for the project. The flame which is perfect for the brazing copper pipe is known as the rosebud flame. Be sure to use a  carburizing or neutral flame.

Brazing copper pipe

 

 

There are 3 simple steps. The first step is to take some time and start with the small flame and it should be large enough to reach most of the place of the copper. Once the pipe heats up, touch the end of the silver brazing alloy to joint at almost 90 degrees, from the flame source. It allows keeping the alloy away from the melting point of the flame. If you have done this process properly then the braze will go around the joint and it will meet the other part of the joint where the flame was. You need to follow the plumbing joint all around with the brazing wire because at the end of the project there should be a fillet weld at the joint. The large sized pipes will require you to move the braze along the joint face.

Heating

              Heat the pipe not the silver-brazing wire ! Use flux ! It is always preferable to under heat rather than overheat. Once you have ringed the joint, move the heat from the fitting. Start at the bottom, then the sides should go fast and they should receive heat from the initial work. You should not wipe the joint until it cools down. You can see it if you watch that the braze goes from the silvery color to the dull color. The dulling gets off once it starts cooling down. If the fitting shows too much of rainbows or turn blue then it means that you have used too much of heat.

              If you are new and have any doubts then you should develop some skills on extra copper scrap. Try it on your own with ease.

See the main page for more detail. Follow the same safety tips, cleaning, sanding, and fluxing techniques on the main page  for sweating copper pipe as for brazing.